Opportunity to present practitioner views on new dredging science

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

Impact prediction, monitoring and the lessons learnt from implementing dredging programs is the focus for discussion led by the Western Australian Marine Science Institution (WAMSI) at the AMSA Conference in July.

The “Perspectives on Dredging” symposium co-Chair and WAMSI CEO Dr Luke Twomey said the purpose of the symposium, in Fremantle, is to gain a better understanding of how new knowledge is being put into practice.

“This is an opportunity for us to understand practitioners’ views on the new science that is being produced and how they are likely to use it,” Dr Twomey said.

“From recent mega-projects in Western Australian and Queensland, to small maintenance dredging programs in coastal waterways, this conversation will help to understand how the science outcomes are being put into practice and help to identify the future direction for research.”

Australia has experienced unprecedented levels of dredging over the last two decades and the nation’s biggest single-issue science program to address the science questions, the WAMSI Dredging Science Node, is about to release the synthesis of those results.

“As a result, there have been some incredible advances in our understanding of impacts to the marine environment from dredging and how to better predict, monitor and manage dredging programs,” Dr Twomey said. “The question now is, how are practitioners using those results?”  

The “Perspectives on Dredging” AMSA symposium is open to scientists, regulators, resource managers, industry, consultants and those with a practical experience of dredging practices in the marine environment.

It will provide an opportunity for dredging professionals to demonstrate their contemporary practical experience and how the impacts of dredging on the marine environment are predicted, managed and monitored in real-world scenarios.

WAMSI is providing the opportunity for day sponsorship for five student presentations at either the “Perspectives on Dredging” or “The South Coast of Western Australia: research for management” symposia at AMSA.

To be considered please submit your abstract to AMSA by COB Friday 22 February AND email your abstract or any questions to info@wamsi.org.au.

 

Final call for submissions: Uncovering data about the South Coast of WA

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

Uncovering the published and unpublished data relating to the economic, social and environmental dimensions of the waters off the south coast is the conversation the Western Australian Marine Science Institution wants to start at this year’s AMSA Symposium in July.

The symposium, in Fremantle, aims to bring the South Coast to the attention of the wider marine science community and government bodies as well as begin to understand the knowledge gaps,  impacts and the opportunities.

Symposium Chair and WAMSI Research Director Dr Jenny Shaw explained the purpose is to bring the research together that will help to develop a strong case for a future WAMSI research program to support south coast marine management.

“This is the first step in understanding what knowledge is available ahead of canvassing government, industry, community and research views on management and what’s important to them about the south coast,” Jenny said.

“Previously there has been little focus on the south coast, however, renewed interest in the opportunity for economic development in this pristine environment has meant it’s time to make this area a focus for research.”  

This symposium session is open to all researchers working off the south coast of Western Australia and welcomes collaborative input into informing management with good science.

WAMSI is offering day sponsorship for five student presentations at its AMSA symposiums.

To be considered please submit your abstract to AMSA by COB Friday 22 February and also email your abstract or any questions to info@wamsi.org.au.

Stakeholder engagement to deliver science plan for Shark Bay

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

A comprehensive plan to respond to environmental pressures facing the Shark Bay World Heritage site is being led by the Western Australian Marine Science Institution (WAMSI).

Scientist throughout WA and the world have been rallying to raise the alarm about the demise of the unique environment and popular tourist destination (800 kilometres north of Perth), which has been experiencing environmental changes more rapidly since a marine heatwave in 2011.

Famous for its abundant marine life including dolphins, dugongs, marine turtles and its rare, ancient stromatolites, the Shark Bay economy also relies on the success of its commercial fishing industry.

WAMSI has announced the start of its review of stakeholder views and science priorities that will determine the best approach for delivering a coordinated response now and into the future.

The stakeholder engagement, led by WAMSI Research Director Dr Jenny Shaw, will take in the views of represented individuals and groups from state and Commonwealth governments, research oganisations, fishers, tourism, conservation, Indigenous and other community stakeholders.

“What we’re trying to understand is the stakeholder issues and opportunities for the Shark Bay area,” Jenny said. “We’ll also conduct a review of the existing knowledge and identify the gaps from the feedback we get from stakeholders. These issues will then be prioritised before we develop a comprehensive Science Plan.”

An international research team at Shark Bay in 2018. (Image: Joan Costa)

 

Dr Shaw authored: Decommissioning offshore infrastructure: a review of stakeholder views and science priorities, in 2018 under WA’s Blueprint for Marine Science 2050 priorities. The WAMSI decommissioning report synthesised more than 900 issues, opportunities and concerns down to 30 questions that could be addressed through scientific research. The review has been identified as a key resource for oil and gas research.

 

Links to related stories on Shark Bay:

Shark Bay: A World Heritage Site at catastrophic risk (The Conversation, Feb 2019)

Growing movement to highlight Shark Bay climate risks (WAMSI, September 2018)

Adapting to ecosystem change in the Shark Bay World Heritage site (WAMSI, June 2018)

Adapting to ecosystem change in the Shark Bay World Heritage Site (Workshop presentations, June 2018)

Shark Bay seagrass loss during ocean heatwave released up to 9m tonnes of CO2, scientists say (ABC, March 2018)

Will Shark Bays seagrass survive big floods? (ECOS – 2011)