WAMSI surveys Shark Bay values

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

A research team, surveying values that are important to the people of Shark Bay, is finding a variety of views are attached to the World Heritage area famous for its marine life and ancient stromatolites, with an economy that largely relies on the success of tourism and fishing industries.

More than 30 members of the community were surveyed last week in this first round of interviews  including representatives from local and state government, fishing and tourism business owners, long-term residents and Indigenous rangers.

The Western Australian Marine Science Institution (WAMSI) will continue to conduct interviews over the coming weeks to determine the values, issues and concerns.

WAMSI Research Director Dr Jenny Shaw said initial indications were that there is a broad range of views across Shark Bay.

WAMSI Research Director Jenny Shaw conducts interviews at the Shark Bay Rec Centre 

 

“Values held by the people of Shark Bay were varied but some common themes have begun to emerge,” Dr Shaw said.  “There was widespread awareness of the massive seagrass loss from the 2011 marine heatwave and concerns about how that might have affected any changes in the bay. Tourism and fishing were also common themes.

“What we’ll do first is collect the research that’s already been done to look at whether some of the answers can be found in those bodies of work.

“Once we’ve brought together all the existing research, we can identify where there might be gaps in knowledge that relate to the values we’ve identified in our interviews. We’ll then develop a comprehensive science plan for Shark Bay to address those gaps.

“It’s a large and complex strategy to develop a comprehensive plan to respond to environmental pressures facing Shark Bay but it’s an important exercise to complete, especially now with increasing tourism,” Dr Shaw said.

 

Shark Bay Fish Factory

 

The RAC Monkey Mia Resort recently doubled its capacity from around 600 to 1200 guests per night. It’s estimated that the resort accommodates less than one third of the total number of visitors who enter the national park to see the dolphins.

This week’s Fishing Fiesta will see the return of some 100 recreational fishers and their families to the town of Denham.

Bag limits for some fish species in Shark Bay are higher than tourist destinations further south, making the region an attractive option for recreational fishers throughout the year.

The Shark Bay Stakeholder Values report and gap analysis is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

 

Links to related stories on Shark Bay:

Stakeholder engagement to deliver science plan for Shark Bay (WAMSI, February 2019)

Shark Bay: A World Heritage Site at catastrophic risk (The Conversation, Feb 2019)

Growing movement to highlight Shark Bay climate risks (WAMSI, September 2018)

Adapting to ecosystem change in the Shark Bay World Heritage site (WAMSI, June 2018)

Adapting to ecosystem change in the Shark Bay World Heritage Site (Workshop presentations, June 2018)

Shark Bay seagrass loss during ocean heatwave released up to 9m tonnes of CO2, scientists say (ABC, March 2018)

Will Shark Bays seagrass survive big floods? (ECOS – 2011)

Growing movement to highlight Shark Bay climate risks

Researchers are calling for an urgent response to mitigate the threats to the Shark Bay World Heritage site from the effects of a changing climate.

The results from a workshop, including 70 science and industry experts, has identified a critical need for management actions to prepare and respond to events like the 2010-11 marine heatwave that devastated seagrasses in the area.

Shark Bay is unique globally for its natural values, including stromatolites, extensive seagrasses that have constructed sills and banks over thousands of years resulting in restricted exchange with the ocean, unique and abundant marine megafauna, including one-eighth of the world’s population of dugongs, large populations of sharks and turtles, and one of the longest studied populations of dolphins in the world.

The loss of 23 per cent of seagrass cover in the bay (860 km2), as a result of the marine heatwave of 2010-2011, had a flow on effect to mega herbivores, fish, tourism and the aquaculture and fisheries dependent of the ecosystem. Events such as marine heatwaves are predicted to increase with global warming.

The workshop, held at Perth’s Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre in June, identified gaps in knowledge needed to support management of the Shark Bay World Heritage Site. It listed actions to bridge the gaps in knowledge and formed a list of suggestions on how best to proceed.

Workshop organiser Professor Gary Kendrick, from The University of Western Australia, said the actions outlined by the group were consistent.

“Overall, it is clear we need to establish a shared vision for a collaborative approach to address the priority areas to support integrated management decisions,” Professor Kendrick said.

Western Australian Marine Science Institution CEO Dr Luke Twomey supported the group’s suggestion to assess the social and economic benefits and priorities of fishing and tourism.

“For this process to have real impact, we need a better understanding of the stakeholder needs to identify the most socially and economically important aspects of this World Heritage site,” Dr Twomey said. “Once we’ve narrowed down the focus, we can develop the science plan needed to fill those gaps in knowledge that will support sustainable management and use of the region.”

“Most importantly we need to make sure that the research can be transferred into outcomes of economic, environmental and social benefit,” Dr Twomey said.

The outcomes of the June workshop will be fed in to a broader climate change workshop being held in Denham (17-19 September) to determine how susceptible the World Heritage site is to climate change, and if anything can be done to manage the effects.

The September workshop, organised by the Shark Bay World Heritage Advisory Committee and hosted by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, aims to develop a vulnerability index that will lead to a climate change adaptation plan.

Adapting to ecosystem change in the Shark Bay World Heritage Site

Five years after a report into the Shark Bay World Heritage site recommended a coordinated collaborative approach was vital to understand changes in the ecosystem, more than 70 science and industry experts have joined forces to examine the threats and prioritise the research needed to save its status.

Shark Bay, located midway along the coast of Western Australia, occupies about 2.2 million hectares of marine and terrestrial reserves, featuring more than 30 islands, the largest (4,800 km2) and richest segrass beds in the world, five species of endangered mammals, as well as stromatolites. It is one of only 30 places on the World Heritage List of 1073, to satisfy all four natural criteria including:

To contain the most important and significant natural habitats for in-situ conservation of biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding universal value from the point of view of science or conservation.

A federal Governmnent report in 2009 titled the Implications of climate change for Australia’s World Heritage properties: a preliminary assessment, highlighted the uncertainties for Shark Bay created by the effect of climate change on the Leeuwin Current. Among its predictions was that increased sea temperatures could see tropical marine life move south and a greater likelihood of predation in the area by tiger sharks.

A marine heatwave in 2011 is now know to have caused a 20 per cent loss of seagrass habitat, equivalent to a loss of 1,000 km2 of meadows. Birth rates in dolphins dropped; crab, oyster and other fisheries were negatively affected. All this, while projected tourism numbers are fell well short of their mark.

In response, a workshop and resulting publication, focused on Shark Bay, recommended a coordinated multi-institutional and multi-discipline approach to research (Kendrick et al. 2012). However, five years on there is little evidence of such a coordinated approach to research.

This month, Professor Gary Kendrick from The University of Western Australia made another call to turn attention toward the potential demise of the unique World Heritage area and the response by more than 70 state, national and international experts was immediate.

“Given the changes that have already occurred and the scale of predicted further changes, a better understanding of the drivers of environmental changes on productivity is a critical step in being able to predict the ecological resilience of Shark Bay,” Professor Kendrick said. “We need to adopt appropriate management strategies to minimise the impacts of environmental variations on natural resources and the industries that depend on them.”

The expert workshop identified priority knowledge gaps and whether something could be done to address them. It assessed the importance of each gap by comparing the consequences of either ‘taking action’ to ‘doing nothing’.

More than 70 Shark Bay science, industry and community stakeholders break into groups to come up with science priorities. (WAMSI)

“It was a great day of brainstorming,” Professor Kendrick said. “Overall, there was consensus on concern over the ecosystem changes in Shark Bay but there was no consensus on how to resolve it.”

Professor Kendrick is now working to collate the workshop responses and identify the top science priorities in a white paper to the state government.

The expert workshop ‘Adapting to ecosystem change in the Shark Bay World Heritage site’ identified concern over ecosystem change but no consensus on how to resolve it. UWA Professor Gary Kendrick will now identify the top priorities for science in a white paper. (WAMSI)

Workshop presentations slides are available HERE

2017 WAMSI Research Conference

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

The partners of the Western Australian Marine Science Institution are delivering two of the largest integrated marine research programs in Australia.

This conference showcased the science, findings, outcomes and products to managers, researchers, industry and government stakeholders.

2017 WAMSI Research Conference Presentations

Dredging Science Node

Day 1 – Wednesday 22nd November 2017

SESSION 1: Opening and keynote presentations

CHAIR: Naomi Brown

Time Presentation Speaker
9:15 Introduction and Welcome to Country. Dr Richard Walley OAM
9:30 Opening the 2017 WAMSI Research Conference. (audio) Minister Dave Kelly

Minister for Water; Fisheries; Forestry; Innovation and ICT; Science

9:40 WAMSI – Delivering research priorities for Western Australia (audio)

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-science-node

Naomi Brown, Chair WAMSI
9:50 Keynote Presentation – Building a Science and Knowledge base for Environmental Impact Assessment. (audio) Tom Hatton, Chair WA DWER
10:10 The power of collaborative science: an industry perspective (audio)

Presentation slides

Mike Utsler, Chief Operating Officer Woodside Energy

 

10:30 A NT perspective on managing dredging  (audio)

Presentation slides

Paul Vogel, Chair NT EPA

 

10:50-11:15 Morning Tea

 

SESSION 2: Overview and Pressure Field Characterisation and Prediction

CHAIR: TBC

11:15 Dredging Science Node – Purpose and pathways to adoption (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-science-node/dsn-reports

Ray Masini, DWER
11:45 Characterisation of dredging pressures in WA – review of the datasets from previous dredging related environmental monitoring programs

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Ross Jones, AIMS

Rebecca Fisher, AIMS

Muhammad Abdul Wahab, AIMS

12:15 Generation and Transport of Dredge Plumes – Synthesis of knowledge and considerations for management  (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/characteristics-sediments

Chaojiao Sun, CSIRO

 

12:45-1:45 Lunch
SESSION 3: Ecological Response Prediction

CHAIR: TBC

 

1:45 Response of corals to dredging: hazard to risk

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Ross Jones, AIMS
2:15 Defining thresholds and indicators of seagrass response to dredging – Synthesis of knowledge and considerations for management

www.wamsi.org.au/primary-producer-response-dredging

Paul Lavery, ECU
2:45 Defining thresholds and indicators of sponge response to dredging – Synthesis of knowledge and considerations for management

www.wamsi.org.au/filter-feeder-responses-dredging

Muhammad Abdul Wahab, AIMS
3:15-3:45 Afternoon Tea
SESSION 4: Environmental windows for critical ecological processes

CHAIR: TBC

3:45 Effects of dredging on coral reproduction – Thresholds and indicators and synthesis of knowledge and considerations for management  (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-pressures-coral

Andrew Negri, AIMS
4:15 Effects of dredging related pressures on critical ecological processes for finfish – Synthesis of knowledge and considerations for management (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-pressures-finfish

Euan Harvey

 

4:35 Effects of dredging related pressures on critical ecological processes for organisms other than fish or coral (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-pressures-other-organisms

Gary Kendrick, UWA

 

4:55 Dredging Science Node – An Overview: what we have learned (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-science-node/dsn-reports

Ray Masini, DWER
5:15 Close  

 

Day 2 – Thursday 23rd November 2017

SESSION 5: Pressure Field Characterisation and Prediction

CHAIR: TBC

9:15 Modelling far-field dredging generated sediment plumes – guidance for proponents and consultants

www.wamsi.org.au/characteristics-sediments

Paul Branson et al.

CSIRO)

09:45 Remote Sensing of Dredge Plumes – how and how not (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/characteristics-sediments

Peter Fearns et al.

Curtin University

10:00 Sediment deposition over benthic habitats – corrections for sediment transport models (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/characteristics-sediments

Ryan Lowe et al.

UWA

10:15 Continuous in situ monitoring of sediment deposition in shallow benthic environments (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

James Whinney et al.

JCU

10:45-

11:15

Morning Tea
SESSION 6: Ecological Response Prediction (CORALS AND SEAGRASS)

CHAIR: TBC

11:30 Dredging and bleaching events (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Ross Jones et al.

AIMS

Laboratory experimentation on the effects of dredging on fertilisation, larval development and settlement of corals (audio)

Presentation slides

Video: Coral larvae settling on calcareous red algae

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-pressures-coral

Gerard Ricardo, AIMS

Andrew Negri, AIMS

11:45 Predicting coral mortality based on water quality during dredging and deriving operational thresholds

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Rebecca Fisher et al.

AIMS

12:00 Measurement and modelling of key demographic processes in corals of the Dampier Archipelago (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Russ Babcock et al.

CSIRO

12:15 Natural dynamics and seasonality of tropical seagrasses and recovery mechanisms of seagrass following disturbance – implications for environmental impact assessment

www.wamsi.org.au/primary-producer-response-dredging

Paul Lavery ECU

Mat Vanderklift et al.

CSIRO

12:30 Genetic variability within seagrass and implications for recovery potential (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/primary-producer-response-dredging

Kathryn McMahon et al.

ECU

12:45-

1:45

Lunch
SESSION 7: Ecological Response Prediction (SEAGRASSES, SPONGES and )

CHAIR: TBC

1:45 Thresholds and indicators of seagrass response to dredge pressures (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/primary-producer-response-dredging

Gary Kendrick, UWA

John Statton, UWA

 

2:00 The influence of light quality on seagrasses (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/primary-producer-response-dredging

Simone Strydom, ECU

 

2:15 Sponges of the Pilbara – a biodiversity hotspot (audio)

(Presentation slides)

Video 1: Sponges dominate filter feeder communities in the Pilbara

Video 2: Sponge Gardens of Ningaloo Reef

www.wamsi.org.au/filter-feeder-responses-dredging

Muhammad Abdul Wahab

AIMS

Jane Fromont et al.

WA Museum

 

2:30 Comparisons of benthic filter feeder communities before and after a large-scale capital dredging program

www.wamsi.org.au/filter-feeder-responses-dredging

Muhammad Abdul Wahab,

AIMS

2:45-3:15 Afternoon Tea
SESSION 8: Ecological Response Prediction (CORAL EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES)

CHAIR:

Sub-lethal indicators of dredging pressures – mucous sheet production in Porites corals (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Pia Bessell-Browne et al.

UWA

Specific and interactive effects of total suspended solids, light attenuation and sediment deposition on adult corals (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/coral-response-dredging

Pia Bessell-Browne et al.

UWA

3:15 Coral reproduction in Western Australia (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dredging-pressures-coral

James Gilmour, AIMS

Russ Babcock, CSIRO

3:45-4:00 Close of Conference and Closing Remarks Naomi Brown, WAMSI Chair

 

Kimberley Marine Research Program

Day 1 – Tuesday, 28 November

Session 1, Chair: Luke Twomey, WAMSI

Opening and keynote presentations

P/P Presentation Speaker
9:00 Introduction and Welcome to Country. (audio) Dr Len Collard
9:15 Opening Address  (audio)

Presentation slides

Chris Tallentire MLA

Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Water; Fisheries; Forestry; Innovation and ICT; Science

9:35 WAMSI – Delivering research priorities for WA (audio) Dr. Luke Twomey,

WAMSI CEO

9:50 Keynote Presentation – The importance of science for conservation management 

(audio)

Professor Chris Doepel PSM, Deputy Chair Conservation Commission
10:15 Morning Tea
Session 2

The Kimberley Marine Research Program

Chair: Stuart Field, DBCA

11:00 Kimberley Node Overview (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/kimberley-marine-research-program

Stuart Field, WAMSI and DBCA
11:20 Living on the Edge: Understanding the adaption and acclimation of nearshore turbid-zone corals to extreme environmental conditions (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/geomorphology

Mick O’Leary, Curtin
11:40 Physical drivers of reefs in the Kimberley (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/benthic-community-production

Ryan Lowe, UWA
12:00 Kimberley seabed biodiversity (audio)

Presentation slides

Video: Camden Sound Solander Tow 060 hard bottom diverse ff

www.wamsi.org.au/benthic-community-production

Karen Miller, AIMS
12:30 Lunch
Session 3

Productivity in the Kimberley

Chair: Kelly Waples, DBCA

13:30 Reef production and nutrient uptake (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/benthic-community-production

Renee Gruber, UWA
13:40 Benthic primary productivity: production and herbivory of seagrasses, macroalgae and microalgae (audio) (audio of Q&A)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/seagrass

Gary Kendrick, UWA
13:55 The magnitude and importance of herbivory in the Kimberley (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/seagrass

Gary Kendrick, UWA
14:05 Remote Sensing (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/remote-sensing

Peter Fearns, Curtin
14:25 Afternoon Tea
Session 4

Ecological processes of the Kimberley

Chair: Stuart Field, DBCA

15:20 Recruitment and herbivory in the southern Kimberley (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/key-ecological-processes

Martial Depczynski, AIMS
15:40 Going with the flow: genomic insights into ecological connectivity in the Kimberley (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/ecological-connectivity

Oliver Berry, CSIRO
16:00 Historical reconstructions of water quality in the Kimberley using sediment records (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/sediment-record

John Keesing, CSIRO
16.20 Climate change as registered by Sr/Ca, Li/Mg, d11B and B/Ca systematics in an ~100-year old Porites coral from the thermally extreme Kimberley region of northwestern Australia (audio)

Presentation Slides

Heat tolerance of Kimberley corals and impacts of the 2016 marine heatwave on coral reefs in the inshore Kimberley region Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/calcification

Malcolm McCulloch, UWA

 

Day 2 – Wednesday, 29th November 2017

Session 1

Best practice indigenous engagement for healthy country management

Chair: Stuart Field, DBCA

9:00 Invited Speaker – People and Saltwater Country in the Kimberley

(Video presentation)

Presentation slides pdf

www.wamsi.org.au/indigenous-knowledge

Dean Mathews, Yawuru and Albert Wiggin, Nyul Nyul
  (Video of presentation)

Using a Multiple Evidence Based approach to mobilise Indigenous knowledge and science

Using social values to inform marine spatial planning

Presentation slides

Invited speakers – Working together on country for healthy country and MPA management Presentation slides pdf

A Regional Framework for Saltwater Monitoring in the Kimberley Presentation slides pdf

www.wamsi.org.au/indigenous-knowledge

Beau Austin, CDU

 

Jennifer Munro, DBCA

 

Dean Mathews, Yawuru

 

Rebecca Dobbs, UWA and Albert Wiggin, Nyul Nyul

10:15 Morning Tea
Session 2

Marine fauna of the Kimberley

Chair: Kelly Waples, DBCA

10:45 Key biological indices required to understand and manage nesting sea turtles along the Kimberley coast (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/marine-turtles

Scott Whiting, DBCA

Tony Tucker, DBCA

Oliver Berry, CSIRO

Integrating Indigenous knowledge and survey techniques to develop a baseline for dugong management in the Kimberley (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dugong

Peter Bayliss, CSIRO
  Modelling the spatial distribution of humpback whales in the Kimberley region of Western Australia (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/humpback-whale-monitoring

Michele Thums, AIMS
  Relative abundance, population genetic structure and passive acoustic monitoring of Australian snubfin and humpback dolphins in regions within the Kimberley (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/dolphins

Josh Smith, Murdoch/Simon Allen UWA, Chandra Salgado Kent, Curtin
  Saltwater crocodiles in the Kimberley (video of presentation)

www.wamsi.org.au/saltwater-crocodiles

Danny Barrow, DBCA
12:00 Lunch
Session 3

Physical and biological processes and what we have learned from modelling

Chair: Stuart Field, DBCA

13:00 What is modelling and why do we care? (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/modelling-future-kimberley-region

Matt Hipsey, UWA and Fabio Boschetti, CSIRO
13:20 Physical oceanographic dynamics in the Kimberley (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/oceanographic-dynamics

Greg Ivey, UWA
13:35 Terrestrial-Ocean Linkages: the role of rivers and estuaries in sustaining marine productivity in the Kimberley (video of presentation)

www.wamsi.org.au/land-ocean-linkages

Nicole Jones, UWA and Andrew Revill, CSIRO
13:50 Biogeochemistry (video of presentation)

 

www.wamsi.org.au/biogeochemical-processes

Matt Hipsey, UWA
14:05 Opposite polarities of ENSO drive distinct patterns of coral bleaching potentials off WA coast (video of presentation)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/climate-change

Ming Feng, CSIRO
14:20 Knowledge Integration and Management Strategy Evaluation (MSE) Modelling (video of presentation)

www.wamsi.org.au/modelling-future-kimberley-region

Fabio Boschetti, CSIRO
14:40 Afternoon Tea
Session 4

Science for ongoing management – how will we use what we have learned

Chair: Luke Twomey, WAMSI

15:10 Invited Speaker: Kimberley Marine Protected Areas (audio)

Presentation slides

Kathleen Lowry, DBCA
15:45 Is the Kimberley coast still a pristine wilderness? (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/human-use

Lynnath Beckley, Murdoch
16:00 Research and monitoring in the Kimberley – setting priorities for the future (audio)

Presentation slides

Tom Holmes, DBCA
16:15 Navigating knowledge currents in Kimberley Saltwater Country (audio)

Presentation slides

www.wamsi.org.au/indigenous-knowledge

Beau Austin, CDU, Dean Mathews, Yawuru  and Albert Wiggin, Nyul Nyul
16:40 Collaborating in science into the future (audio) Patrick Seares, OEPA
  Closing Remarks and Close of Conference (audio) Luke Twomey, WAMSI

WAMSI Research Conference 2015

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

The partners of the Western Australian Marine Science Institution are delivering two of the largest marine research programs in Australia, alongside a raft of other important research.

At the 2015 Research Conference (30th March – 1st April 2015) WAMSI partners and affilates came together to discuss the progress and latest findings from over 50 projects.

Location: State Library of Western Australia, Perth.

Ministerial media statement

Click here to view the conference schedule.

Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

Format

  • Day 1 (AM) Opening addresses, a summary of progress and future directions by the WAMSI partnership
  • Day 1 (AM) Presentations on other key WA marine research programs
  • Day 1 (PM) and Day 2 (AM)  Dredging Science Node – The end of stage 1: synthesis of contemporary knowledge on dredging impacts and presentations on each of the projects
  • Day 2 (PM) and Day 3 (AM/PM) Kimberley Marine Research Program – Mid-program summary review and findings and presentation on each project
  • Day 3 (PM) 12.15 – 1pm Special Event: Launch of the Blueprint for Marine Science 2050 by Hon. Colin Barnett MLA, Premier of Western Australia and Minister for Science; Chair of the Independent Blueprint Steering Committee E/Prof Alistar Robertson and WAMSI Chair Naomi Brown.

Audio of presentations

Launch of the Blueprint for Marine Science 2050 (1 April 2015)

Day 1 (March 30, 2015)

Session: Opening and keynote presentations

  1. Patrick Seares, WAMSI CEO – WAMSI – summary of progress and future directions  (presentation slides)
  2. Paul Vogel, EPA Chairman – Keynote presentation – Building a Science Knowledge base for Environmental Impact Assessment   (presentation slides)
  3. Hon Donna Faragher MLC, Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier, Minister for State Development, Science – Opening the 2015 WAMSI Research Conference
  4. Peter Klinken, Chief Scientist o Western Australia – Keynote presentation – Science priorities for Western Australia

Session 2

  1. Shaun Gregory, Woodside Energy, Senior Vice Pres. Science and Technology – Keynote Presentation – an industry perspective on strategic marine science.  (presentation slides)
  2. Patrick Seares, WAMSI CEO – Initiatives to improve collaboration on information, wildlife and estuaries.
  3. Margaret Byrne, Department of Parks and Wildlife – The role of science in conservation management.   (presentation slides)
  4. Michael Marnane, Chevron – Management based on science: Applying learnings from Gorgon to the Chevron Wheatsone dredging program (presentation slides)
  5. Bruce Elliot, GBRMPA – A QLD perspective on outcomes focused research for both dredging and marine park management.    (presentation slides)

Session 3: Dredging Node – Introduction and themes 2 and 3 (generation and transport of dredge plumes)

  1. Ray Masini, OEPA – Dredging Science Node Overview   (presentation slides)
  2. Tim Green, BMT JFA Consultants – Invited speaker: Dredging 101    (presentation slides)
  3. Graham Symonds, CSIRO – Theme 2/3 overview, Generation and transport of dredge plumes.   (presentation slides)
  4. Des Mills, Marine Environmental Reviews – Generation and release of sediments by hydraulic dredging  (presentation slides)
  5. Ryan Lowe, UWA – Redefining sediment transport models over sensitive benthic habitats   (presentation slides)
  6. Peter Fearns, Curtin – The light environment in turbid waters  (presentation slides)
  7. Graham Symonds, CSIRO – Modelling dredging generated sediment plumes.  (presentation slides)

Session 4: Dredging Node – Themes 5 & 6 (seagrass and sponges)

  1. Ian Le Provost, Environmental Consultant Association – Invited Speaker: Consultant’s perpective on WAMSI Dredging Science Node  (presentation slides)
  2. Paul Lavery, ECU – Theme 5 overview: Defining thresholds of primary producer response to dredge pressures  (presentation slides)
  3. Kathryn McMahon, ECU – Genetic variability, seasonal dynamics and recovery mechanisms of tropical seagrasses – update on field programs in northwest Australia.  (presentation slides)
  4. John Statton, UWA – Deriving pressure-response relationships of tropical seagrasses to dredge pressures – a laboratory approach  (presentation slides)
  5. Nicole Webster, AIMS – Theme 6 overview, Defining thresholds of filter feeder response to dredge pressures  (presentation slides)  (video 1)  (video 2)
  6. Muhammad Abdul Wahab, AIMS – Observations from pre-dredgings surveys of filter feeders at Onslow  (presentation slides)
  7. Brian Strethlow, UWA/AIMS – Indentifying, characterising and quantifying the effects of dredging on sponges (Porifera)   (presentation slides)  (video)
  8. Mari-Carmen Pineda, AIMS – Deriving pressure-response relationships of sponges to dredge pressures – a laboratory approach.  (presentation slides)

Day 2 (March 31, 2015)

Dredging Node – Themes 4 & 7 (corals and coral reproduction windows)

  1. Luke Smith, Woodside – Invited Speaker: Industry perpective on WAMSI Dredging Science 
  2. Ross Jones, AIMS – Theme 4 Overview, Dredging and Corals  (presentation slides)
  3. Alan Duckworth, AIMS – Specific and interactive effects of total suspended solids, light attenuation and sediment deposition on adult corals  (presentation slides)
  4. Rebecca Fisher, AIMS – Turning data into management recommendations: Predicting coral mortality based on water quality during dredging   (presentation slides)
  5. James Whinney, JCU – Measuring sediment deposition during dredging programs: development of an in situ deposition sensor   (presentation slides)  (video)
  6. Clair Stark, JCU – Measuring sediment deposition during dredging programs: modelling approaches  (presentation slides)
  7. Andrew Negri, AIMS – Theme 7 Overview, Effects of dredging on coral reproduction   (presentation slides)
  8. James Gilmour, AIMS – Review of coral reproduction in WA and current state of knowledge  (presentation slides)  (video)
  9. Gerard Ricardo, AIMS – Laboratory experimentation on the effects of dredging on fertilisation, larval development and settlement of corals (presentation slides)    (video 1)  (video 2)

Session 2: Dredging Node themes 8 & 9 (environmental windows for finfish and other organisms)

  1. Wayne Young, Pilbara Ports Authority – Invited Speaker: Dredging in the Pilbara – Ports perspective   (presentation slides)
  2. Euan Harvey, Curtin – Theme 8 Overview, Effects of dredging related pressures on critical ecological processes for finfish  (presentation slides)
  3. Gary Kendrick, UWA – Theme 9 Overview, Effects of dredging related pressures on critical ecological processes for other organisms  (presentation slides)

Session 3: Kimberley Node – Understanding the history and the habitats of the Kimberley

  1. Stuart Field, DPaW – Kimberley Node Overview  (presentation slides)
  2. Barry Wilson – Invited Speaker: The Kimberley Environment  (presentation slides)
  3. Lindsay Collins, Curtin – Geomorphology  (presentation slides)
  4. Andrew Heyward, AIMS – Benthic Biodiversity  (presentation slides)
  5.   (video 1)  (Video 2)
  6. Luke Edwards, WAMSI – Data Management  (presentation slides)
  7. Mick O’Leary, Curtin – Use of LIDAR in the Kimberley  (presentation slides)

Session 4: Kimberley Node – Physical processes and primary productivity – Feeding the System

  1. Greg Ivey, UWA – Oceanography  (presentation slides)
  2. Matt Hipsey, UWA – Biochemistry  (presentation slides)
  3. Andy Revill, CSIRO – Land-sea Linkages  (presentation slides)
  4. Ryan Lowe, UWA – Primary production  (presentation slides)
  5. Gary Kendrick and Renae Hovey, UWA – Seagrass and mapping productivity   (presentation slides)

Day 3 (April 1, 2015)

Session 1: Kimberley Node – Managing marine resources and values

  1. Tom Hatton, Invited Speaker: Western Australia’s Kimberley marine parks and WAMSI 
  2. Daniel Oades, KLC – Invited Speaker: Partnering with Indigenous communities  (presentation slides)
  3. Lynnath Beckley, Murdoch – Patterns of human use  (presentation slides)
  4. Jennifer Strickland-Munro, Murdoch – Social values and aspirations (presentation slides)
  5. Albert Wiggan, Nyul Nyul Rangers – Indigenous knowledge  (presentation slides)
  6. Fabio Boschetti, CSIRO – Management strategy evaluation  (presentation slides)

Session2: Kimberley Node – Ecological processes and change in the Kimberley

  1. Mat Vanderklift, CSIRO – Key ecological processes  (presentation slides)
  2. Ming Feng, CSIRO – Climate Change  (presentation slides)
  3. Verena Schoepf, UWA – Calcification  (presentation slides)
  4. John Keesing, CSIRO – Sediment records  (presentation slides)
  5. Oliver Berry, CSIRO – Connectivity  (presentation slides)

Session 3: Kimberley Node – Marine fauna and developing long term monitoring and research

  1. Brett Molony, DoF – Invited Speaker: Fisheries research in the Kimberley  (presentation slides)
  2. Scott Whiting, DPaW – Marine Turtles  (presentation slides)
  3. Michele Thums, AIMS – Humback Whale   (presentation slides)
  4. Andy Halford, DPaW – Crocodiles  (presentation slides)
  5. Mat Vanderklift, CSIRO – Dugongs  (presentation slides)
  6. Lars Bejdar, Murdoch – Dolphins  (presentation slides)
  7. Danny Rogers, AWSG – Shorebirds  (presentation slides)
  8. Peter Fearns, Curtin – Remote Sensing   (presentation slides)
  9. Kim Friedman, DPaw – Invited Speaker: WAMMP – KMRP research informing long term monitoring  (presentation slides)
  10. Patrick Seares, WAMSI, Close of conference and closing remarks 

Industry and science focus on WA marine research

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

Industry and marine research leaders presented the latest issues and findings affecting the future of Western Australian marine environment at the WAMSI research conference 2015 (Monday 30 March-1 April) launched by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier and Minister for State Development and Science, Hon. Donna Faragher MLC.

Among the keynote speakers;

  • Paul Vogel (EPA Chairman) – Science, knowledge and managing risk through environmental impact assessment;
  • Shaun Gregory (Woodside Energy, Senior Vice President Science and Technology) – An industry perspective on strategic marine science;
  • Michael Marnane (Chevron) – Applying lessons learnt from Gorgon to the Chevron Wheatstone dredging program;
  • Wayne Young (Pilbara Ports Authority) – Ports perspective of dredging in the Pilbara;
  • Tom Hatton (Marine Parks and Reserves Authority of Western Australia) – The future of WA’s Kimberley Marine Parks
  • Brett Moloney (Department of Fisheries WA) – With a new Fisheries Act likely, the needs of management for robust and timely research.
  • Peter Klinken (WA Chief Scientist) – WA’s research focus; and
  • Patrick Seares (WAMSI CEO) An overview of research progress, future direction and initiatives to improve collaboration on information.

    Over the course of the three day conference, lead researchers and industry representatives who are working on WAMSI’s 50 research projects under the Kimberley Marine Research Program and the Dredging Science Node also provided latest updates on their research.

Link to full schedule, abstracts and audio of presentations 

Link to Premier’s media statement  

Premier launches Marine Science Blueprint at WAMSI conference

This article was originally published on an archived WAMSI website. Some media or links may appear missing or broken. You can use the search function to look for these, or contact info@wamsi.org.au for a specific request.

Western Australian Premier and Minister for Science Hon. Colin Barnett MLA launched the WA Blueprint for Marine Science 2050 at the Western Australian Marine Science Institution (WAMSI) research conference (30 March-1 April).

The Blueprint is an important initiative that aims to help government, research institutions and industry to better plan and collaborate on the priority marine research needed to support the future prosperity of WA and the nation.

The recommendations are the culmination of comprehensive consultation focusing on the end users of research, business, industry, government and community groups brought together by an independent steering group led by renowned scientist and advocate for collaborative research, E/Prof Alistar Robertson.

Premier Barnett, Professor Robertson and WAMSI CEO Patrick Seares launched the Blueprint on Wednesday 1st April 2015 at 1.30pm at the WAMSI Conference held at the State Library.

WAMSI Conference 

The 2015 research conference has provided progress updates and latest findings from more than 50 WAMSI projects being delivered by its partner organisations forming part of two of the largest marine research programs in Australia.

Among the keynote speakers;

  • EPA Chairman Paul Vogel will discuss science, knowledge and managing risk through environmental impact assessment;
  • Woodside Energy, Senior Vice President Science and Technology, Shaun Gregory, will provide an industry perspective on strategic marine science;
  • WA Chief Scientist Peter Klinken will present his views on the State’s research focus; and
  • WAMSI CEO Patrick Seares will present an overview of research progress, future direction and initiatives to improve collaboration on information.

Over the course of the three day conference, lead researchers and industry representatives who are working with WAMSI on the Kimberley Marine Research Program and the Dredging Science Node provided updates on the foundational research supporting these programs including:

  • Reports on the most up to date information available for use in dredging operations and management, including lessons learned from the Gorgon Dredging Project at Barrow Island and its application to the management of the Wheatstone Dredging Project at Onslow; and
  • Key findings and future direction for marine research being carried out for the first time in the unique conditions that exist off the Kimberley coast.

WAMSI Conference 2015

Location:        The State Library of Western Australia

Perth Cultural Centre, 25 Francis Street, Perth

Date:              Monday 30 March – Wednesday 1 April 2015.

Click here to view the full conference schedule (as at 26/02/2015)

More information including conference schedule updates, abstracts and audio/PowerPoint presentations are available on the WAMSI Conference 2015 webpage.

Coastal Planning and Oceanographic Research Seminar 2

The second in WAMSI’s seminar series focused on coastal management and the research that supported it. Presentations were given from local governments on operational management, state government on coastal planning, and researchers on the coastal and oceanographic research work that is being done to improve how we can manage coastal development.

It was planned around these topics to give a range of perspectives from both the users of marine science, and from researchers, to help drive better understanding of what is needed and what is being done, and help form relationships between decisions makers and scientists.

The following topics were reviewed:

  • Coastal planning and management
  • Local management practices, costs, and strategic planning for Rockingham
  • Latest oceanographic understanding relevant to coastal impacts in the southwest
  • Recent coastal sedimentation and erosion research in Western Australia
  • Storm surge and planned improvements in coastal modelling capability

North West Australia Marine Science Symposium

The North West Australia Marine Science symposium hosted by WAMSI, at the WA Maritime Museum in Fremantle on the Thursday 21 February 2013 was a great sucess as it brought together researchers from government, industry, scientific agencies and academia to provide a five year ‘snapshot’ of upcoming marine science in the Gascoyne, Pilbara and Kimberley coastline areas.

Below are a list of some of the speaker presentations.

Luke Edwards – Western Australian Node of the Australian Ocean Data Network (WAODN) Metadata Catalogue – what’s thereLuke Edwards – CATAMI (Collaborative and Annotation Tools for Analysis of Marine Imagery and video)

Chris Simpson – Kimberley Marine Research Program

Kelly Waples – Building capacity for marine wildlife research in WA through a Marine Wildlife node of WAMSI

Ryan Lowe – Physical and coupled ecological processes within Australia’s northwest coral reef ecosystems

Piers Larcombe – Shelf sediment transport in NW Australia over decades to centuries: a knowledge gap for science, development & regulation

Simon Allen – MUCRU’s North West Australian Marine Mammal Research: 2013 and beyond

MIng Feng – The Ningaloo Niño

Kim Freidman – What WAMMP needs from WAMSI in the Kimberley and related NW Research?

Glenn Hyndes – Edith Cowan University’s research in the north-west

Lindsay Collins – Curtin’s Northwest Marine Research, Next 5 Years

Richard Brinkman – Bio-physical Oceanography of the Kimberley coastal region

Kimberley Onton – Migratory shorebird research in north west Australia

David Morgan – Threatened fish related research in the north-west

Fiona Valesini – Characteristics of the fish and invertebrate fauna in Kimberley estuaries

Clay Bryce – The WA Museum’s Woodside Kimberley Biodiversity projects: Yesterday, today and tomorrow!

Malcolm McCulloch – Resilience of Coral Reefs of NW Western Australia to Climatic Extremes and Environmental Impacts

Shaun Collin – The Pilbara Marine Conservation Partnership

Ming Feng – Marine connectivity in the Pilbara-Ningaloo region

Jane Fromont – Conservation Systematics of the western Pilbara fauna

Kimberley Marine Science Seminar 9 November

WHAT: A series of 3 FREE seminars on past, current and planned research in the Kimberley
WHEN: 1:30-3:30pm, Friday 9 November
WHERE: WA Conservation Science Centre, Dick Perry Avenue, Kensington, WA

SEMINAR 3: FRIDAY 9 NOVEMBER
The WAMSI Kimberley Marine Science Program: A once in a lifetime opportunity

Dr Chris Simpson

Program Leader Marine Science Program, Department of Environment & Conservation

Node Leader, WAMSI Kimberley Marine Science Program

Recent resource development proposals by oil and gas companies to process and export Browse Basin hydrocarbons on the Kimberley mainland and offshore islands have recently put the entire Kimberley region under the spotlight. Although the number of people living in the Kimberley and visitors to this region is still relatively small, the natural and cultural values of the Kimberley region are very well known by Australians. The Kimberley region is considered widely as one of the world’s last great wilderness areas, a biodiversity ‘hotspot’ and a centre of Aboriginal culture. The resource development proposals provided impetus for the State Government’s Kimberley Science and Conservation Strategy (KSCS) that would help ensure that any development would be compatible with the maintenance of the natural and Aboriginal heritage values of this region.

The WAMSI Kimberley Marine Science Program is a key element of the KSCS and is a once in a lifetime opportunity to undertake and integrated program of marine research in this region. The KMRP  is focused on providing the scientific information to underpin the conservation and management of the marine environment of the Kimberley in general and the proposed regional network of marine parks and reserves in particular. The KMRP began formally with the endorsement of KMRP Science Plan by the WAMSI Board in December 2011. The KMRP Science Plan was preceded by several other documents and reports, including the 2008 WAMSI a turning of the tide report, highlighting the urgent need for a program of marine research in the Kimberley coastal waters.

The presentation will briefly outline the history, objectives, geographical focus, research directions and outcomes of the KMRP. The operational and logistical difficulties of undertaking marine research in such a large and remote location will also be discussed.

Download slides

An insider’s perspective on marine research in the Kimberley

Mr James Brown

General Manager, Kimberley Marine Research Station & Cygnet Bay Pearls

The Kimberley Marine Research Station (KMRS) was first established in 2009 with guidance from WAMSI in an endeavour to support and contribute to an enhanced marine science effort throughout the remote Kimberley region of the far north-west.

KMRS was founded upon the overarching ethos of generating the highest standard of truly independent, peer-reviewed scientific output for the greater public good, working towards bridging relevant knowledge gaps on this remarkable yet largely under-studied marine region.

Located at Cygnet Bay Pearl Farm on the tip of the Dampier Peninsula, 200km by road north of Broome, the KMRS venture was pioneered by Kimberley born-and-bred marine biologist and third generation pearl farmer James Brown.

Today, KMRS represents one of only five marine research stations along WA’s 27,000km coastline; the first and only fully operational marine research facility along the 13,500km contours of Kimberley coastline; and the only privately funded marine research facility in the country.

Along with resident marine scientists based permanently on-site year round, the Station offers a mainland base, vessels, infrastructure, support personnel and 65 years’ worth of local knowledge and marine expertise to researcher teams with boating, diving and aquarium facilities available for research use.

This presentation will provide insight into the opportunities, logistics and exciting potential for marine scientists interested in operating in and on Kimberley waters through KMRS.

RSVP

RSVPs are essential please, for catering purposes

General public and media welcome to attend

RSVP & more info: Dina Erba dina.erba@wamsi.org.au

VENUE
WA Conservation Science Centre, Department of Environment & Conservation,
Dick Perry Avenue, Kensington

PAST SEMINARS

SEMINAR 2: FRIDAY 21 SEPTEMBER

Prof Charitha Pattiaratchi (UWA)

WAIMOS Infrastructure in the Kimberley

West Australian Integrated Marine Observation System (WAIMOS) is a node of the Integrated Marine Observation System (IMOS) and with recent co-investment from the WA State Government, extended its deployment of infrastructure to the northern waters of Western Australia, including the Kimberley region.  In this presentation, the current status of the instrumentation deployed and example data highlights will be presented. The IMOS infrastructure located in these regions includes continental shelf moorings (ADCP, thermistor and water quality loggers) and ocean glider transects for subsurface water properties; passive acoustic sensors for whale monitoring; AUV transects for benthic monitoring and, remotely sensed data products (SST and ocean colour).  In the north-west the infrastructure is designed to monitor the influence of north-west shelf region on Leeuwin Current dynamics and the local continental shelf processes.  Examples of different processes, identified using the data streams from the Kimberley region will be presented.

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Mr Clay Bryce (WA Museum)

The WA Museum Woodside Collection Projects (Kimberley): 2008-2015

The WA Museum has been accumulating data on Kimberley marine fauna since 1976. In 2008 the Museum’s Department of Aquatic Zoology decided to ascertain the current state of the region’s marine biodiversity knowledge. With help from Woodside Energy, it embarked on an ambitious program to mine Kimberley marine faunal data from Australian museums, as well as floral records from the WA Herbarium. This resulted in over 60,000 records equating to over 6000 marine species. Augmenting this historical approach is a series of contemporary rapid assessment surveys (2009 – 2014), from Cape Leveque to the WA/NT border, examining 8 faunal taxa and the marine flora. This talk will provide an overview of these marine biodiversity programs.

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SEMINAR 1: TUESDAY 31 JULY

Dr Barry Wilson (Murex Consultants)

Patterns of life on Kimberley shores

The major controls of palaeographic development of the North West Shelf, including the Kimberley, have been climatic and sea level change and tectonism. The history of these events, especially those of the Quaternary, superimposed on the regional geology, has determined the range of habitats, the biological connectivity between them and adjacent regions, and the evolutionary development of the marine fauna. In this presentation, the contemporary marine fauna of the Kimberley is discussed in these historical biogeographic terms.

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Dr James Gilmour (AIMS)

Two decades of research on the Kimberly’s oceanic reef systems: dynamics and connectivity of coral assemblages in a changing world

Two decades of research on the Kimberly’s oceanic reef systems: dynamics and connectivity of coral assemblages in a changing world

This talk summarises almost twenty years of research by AIMS on the oceanic reefs of north-western Australia, focusing on the Scott Reef system. Scott Reef is unique in being far from the influence of many human activities responsible for the degradation of coral reefs globally, but for a catastrophic mass bleaching event in 1998. The 80% reduction in coral cover that followed provided an opportunity to quantify the rates and processes of recovery following a massive climatic disturbance. The recovery of the reef after 12 years is explained in the context of its connectivity to other reef systems and the underlying demography of its coral assemblages.

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